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| Last Updated: 04/10/2018

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INTERNATIONAL DAY FOR THE CONSERVATION OF THE MANGROVE ECOSYSTEM

APPEAL OF THE DIRECTOR FROM DEPARTMENT OF ENVIRONMENT FOR
INTERNATIONAL DAY FOR THE CONSERVATION OF THE
 MANGROVE ECOSYSTEM ON 26 TH JULY 2018
 
 
               Mangroves are rare, spectacular and prolific ecosystems on the boundary between land and sea. Mangroves ecosystem is rich in biodiversity located at the interface of land and sea. These help in ensuring food security for many coastal communities. The UN Educational Scientific and cultural organization (UNESCO) declared July 26, 2016, the first “International Day for the Conservation of the Mangrove Ecosystem” and also known as “World Mangrove Day”. The UNESCO’s proclamation states that, “Considering that mangroves are a unique, special and vulnerable ecosystem, providing by virtue of their existence, biomass and productivity substantial benefits to human beings, providing forestry, fishery goods and services as well as contributing to the protection of the coastline and being particularly relevant in terms of mitigation of the effects of climate change and food security for local communities”.
 
 
             Mangroves can play an important role in reducing vulnerability to natural hazards and increasing resilience to climate change impacts. Mangroves act as a form of natural coastal defense: reducing erosion, attenuating waves (and tsunamis) and even reducing the height of storm surges. Mangrove soils are highly effective carbon sinks, sequestering vast amounts of carbon over millennia. If destroyed, degraded or lost these coastal ecosystems become sources of carbon dioxide. Much of this emitted carbon is thousands of years old and other processes in the ecosystem do not balance its rapid release into the oceans and atmosphere. Over half of the world’s mangrove forests have been lost in the last century, many of them to aquaculture, agriculture and development. The dozens of diverse mangrove species, which live in tropical and subtropical tidal flats around the world, have in common a tolerance for salt water.  

On this day, I urge all to take responsibility for joining hands with common people, Government agencies, NGOs, and people of all the community to enhance public awareness towards the conservation of the mangrove ecosystem. It is important to spread the awareness highlighting the issues of land reclamation, coastal regulation zone notification and encroachment and illegal destruction of the mangrove ecosystem. Therefore, all efforts should result in increased public awareness of the importance of mangroves, their survival and increase the spread of mangrove foothold.
 
 
 
Director of Environment